State’s Colleges See Rapid Growth


Bismarck
November 15, 1915

Lewis F. Crawford, the new chair of the Board of Regents, reports rapid expansion of college education. Over 3,000 students are enrolled in our eight institutions. In addition to the University, which opened in 1883, the Agricultural College and Valley City and May-ville normal schools opened in 1890; the Industrial and Normal School at Ellendale in 1899; the School of Science in Wahpeton in 1904; the School of Forestry at Bottineau in 1907. In 1913 Minot Normal School began instruction and there is talk of a new one for Dickinson.
Crawford, a Harvard graduate, is especially proud that professional education is now available. The University has courses of study in law, engineering, and medicine. The Agricultural College offers pharmacy, veterinary medicine, engineering, and architecture

New buildings on college campuses.  Courtesy of D. Jerome Tweton.

By Dr. D. Jerome Tweton

Source

Originally published as The North Star Dakotan student newspaper, written by Dr. D. Jerome Tweton and supported by the North Dakota Humanities Council.

Grade Level

3-4

Subject Matter

Social Studies

North Star Dakotan:

Journals and Art Work: The Indian People, The Trade, and The Land

The Indian People

The Purchase and Exploration of Louisiana

The Fur Trade

Dakota Territory

The Military Frontier

The Reservation System

George Armstrong Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn

The Great Dakota Boom, 1878-1890

Reservation Troubles, 1886-1890

The Making of a State and a Constitution

The North Dakota Economy, 1890-1915

Life on the Indian Reservations

The North Dakota National Guard and the Philippines

North Dakota, The Great War and After

The Nonpartisan League's Rise to Power

The Nonpartisan League in Power

The Nonpartisan League's Decline

The 1920s

1930s: North Dakota's Economic and Political Climate

The New Deal in North Dakota

The Road to World War II

North Dakota and American Society

North Dakota Optimism and Economic Developments

North Dakota and Political Change